Strength Training for Burnout

As I started to listen more closely, I found myself deeply concerned.

Probably 70% of the women I speak with report the symptoms of burnout. Many women have been formally diagnosed with some degree of adrenal fatigue or insufficiency.

At first, I assumed that what these women were explaining was simply run-of-the-mill fatigue. Most often, general fatigue can be cleared up with smart physical fitness programming and intelligent nutrition.

I have a fantastic track record of helping women to feel better, more energized and fully empowered.

But lately, I seem to be getting more calls from women who are explaining something beyond feeling tired from a long day.

While there are many nuances to adrenal fatigue, the most concerning symptoms include:

  • Feeling tired but wired
  • Stressed out by small decisions and circumstances
  • The inability to relax
  • Poor recovery from moderate workouts
  • Severe energy and mood fluctuations

Many women sum up the experience as “crushing fatigue” – the kind where all you can think about is hiding in bed for a month.

Sound familiar? It certainly does for me, as I have been dealing with these symptoms myself for the past few months.

It’s important to know that what I’m talking about today is beyond the normal kind of fatigue that you might feel at the end of a tough day. Today I am referring to exhaustion that demands your attention.

If this topic hits home, listen up!

Your adrenal glands produce important hormones that regulate energy and mood. They are very delicate, and don’t withstand chronic stress very well. Too much for too long causes these small glands to become exhausted.

It stands to reason that time off from exercise would be a good path to restoration, right? And in fact, some doctors recommend complete avoidance of exercise during a phase of adrenal recovery.

For cases when the symptoms of burnout and fatigue are manageable- albeit troubling- exercise and strength training can be very supportive and helpful in the recovery process.

Exercise (and strength training in particular) when done correctly help to “recharge the batteries” of the adrenal glands. In some ways, exercise is critical for true restoration.

The important thing to remember is that all exercise and strength training workouts should be moderate in intensity and time. The name of the game is to boost energy, and avoid stressing or taxing the system.

Check out this week’s new video to learn more on this topic…

This Week’s Exclusive Content

Strength Workout for Adrenal Burnout

 Below you will find a two-day split strength workout that you can use during times of burnout or following a formal diagnosis of adrenal fatigue.

It’s key to remember that all workouts should feel GOOD and supportive. The goal is to leave the workout feeling energized and better – not exhausted.

Choose moderate weight loads where the intensity during each set remains moderate. Keep an eye on your heart rate and allow for longer rest period between sets if needed.

  • Workout A
  • Exercise
  • Goblet Squat
  • All Fours Crunch
  • Bent Over Single Arm Row
  • Walking Lunges
  • Dumbbell Side Raise
  • Workout A
  • Sets
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • Workout A
  • Reps
  • 12
  • 15
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • Workout B
  • Exercise
  • Dumbbell Squat
  • Bicycles
  • Dumbbell Chest Press
  • Dumbbell Glute Bridge
  • Dumbbell Tricep Overhead Extension
  • Workout B
  • Sets
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • Workout B
  • Reps
  • 12
  • 20
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12

Check out the video tutorials for all the moves on my Women’s Strength Nation YouTube channel HERE.

Want to hear even more on this topic?Join me live every Wednesday on Facebook and Instagram and I’ll be talking more in depth and answering your questions. Check out “LIVE with Holly” by clicking HERE.

Stay strong, friend!

5 replies
  1. Lisa Alexander
    Lisa Alexander says:

    That helped! I’ve had a sneaky feeling that my light weights sometimes feel good even when I can lift heavier. Fatigue and lack of sleep, I think, have been culprits. Glad to know I getting my money’s worth out of my lighter weights and I shouldn’t toss them out!

    Reply
  2. rebecca arsena
    rebecca arsena says:

    I am dealing with this currently too. Thank you for this video- I was thinking all I could do was walk and yoga, but grateful to see that I can keep weight lifting within reason

    Reply
  3. Magan
    Magan says:

    I can so relate. 9 years ago I had a hysterectomy and suffered adrenal fatigue for a couple years following. Once again, I feel very similar symptoms. I workout regularly and love working out. Once I get started I want to lift heavy and I feel great during the workout and for a couple hours after and then bam! Crash! Exhausted! I have not had a cortisol test done this time around but suspect that is the problem. It also leaves me with the physical feelings of anxiety. Oh and I sleep like crap…lol.

    Reply
    • Holly Perkins
      Holly Perkins says:

      Hi Magan,
      Definitely sounds like your experiencing symptoms of burnout. A hysterectomy absolutely alter your hormone levels so I’m not shocked you’re experiencing this. Would love to know if you get a cortisol test done!

      In Strength,
      Holly

      Reply

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